Theme Sessions

Jaap Bakker (Rijkswaterstaat)
Utrecht, The Netherlands

Bart Luiten (TNO)
Delft, The Netherlands

Improving the performance of our assets over their life cycle relies heavily on the timely availability of accurate, actual and accessible data. There are many new developments in data technologies that are helping us to overcome the challenges on data management improving the way we manage the performance of assets over the life cycle management.

 

Session 1 (Monday, 11:00 – 13:00)

1.Leveraging Big Data platforms for data and information managementMohammed Idrees
2.Buildings life-cycle costs information managementFilipa Salvado
3.The CEDR-INTERLINK approach towards Asset Information ManagementBart Luiten
4.Use of remote sensing for optimising the maintenance strategy of road transition zones: a data-driven solutionAna Teixeira
5. A data-driven approach to probabilistic budget forecastingMartine van den Boomen
6.3D Linked Data and BIM for Life Cycle Information ManagementJaap Bakker

 

Session 2 (Monday, 16:30 – 18:00)

1.Strain Estimation from Acceleration Data by Using Deep LearningShamim Pakzad
2.Application of Recurrent Neural Network on Structural Health MonitoringChih-Hao Chou
3.Rotating machinery health diagnosis using discrete wavelet transform and denoising auto encoder networksChiang Yen-Han
4.Predictive maintenance planning of road bridges using entity embedding deep neural networksZahara Allah Bukhsh
5. Optimal bridge maintenance cost calculation algorithms considering members correlation using genetic algorithmsSungyeol Jin

Henk Jonkers (TU Delft)
Delft, the Netherlands

Mitsuyoshi Akiyama (Waseda University)
Tokyo, Japan

Durability is the ability of a physical product to remain functional, without requiring excessive maintenance or repair, when faced with the challenges of normal operation over its design lifetime. Structures will age in time, and at some time need maintenance or need to be replaced. In Life Cycle Management durability issues need to be addressed. Ageing leads to risks an cost over the life cycle. Optimal maintenance and repair strategies deliver optimal performance over the life cycle.

 

Session (Monday, 11:00 – 13:00)

1.Study on Effect of Arc Crack on Fatigue Properties of Orthotropic Steel Bridge Deck under Complex Stress StatesQiang Guo
2.Mix designs targeting sustainable concretes require sufficient clinker content to ensure durability performance over the intended constructions service lifeHenk Jonkers
3.Service life prediction of reinforced concrete structures through modelling: A lucrative numbers gameBart Hendrix
4.Structural response estimation with hybrid data-driven physics-based submodelingShamim Pakzad
5. A new precursor for bacteria-based self-healing concrete derived from organic waste streamsHenk Jonkers

Ferdinand Diermanse (Deltares)
Delft, the Netherlands

Frank den Heijer (Han University of applied sciences)
Arnhem, the Netherlands

Civil infrastructure often bears functions related to flood risk reduction, water management, navigation, mobility or a combination of those. Existing infrastructure generally has long technical life spans, but has not been generally designed to adapt for changes in use, climate or regulations. Currently, a considerable part of the (water) infrastructure is approaching the end its service life and large investments are required for rebuilding, adjusting, renovation and maintenance.

Resilience in Life Cycle Management deals with resilient life cycle engineering, resilient life cycle design & construction, and resilience in the operation and maintenance. Central issue for this topic is: “How to anticipate possible future changes and extreme events (Life Cycle Risk Management).”

Traditionally, fixed design horizons are used in the design and maintenance. But, along the way the actual ‘optimal’ life time can be affected by external developments like climate change and socio-economic changes or transitions. This session discusses on how to deal with such (deep) uncertainties in the design?

This theme session will focus on the life cycle assessment and management of water infrastructure like dikes, bridge piers/piles, sluices, locks, retaining walls, sewage and drinking water, harbor infrastructure, reservoirs and dams, etc; The focus of their management is shifting from condition and risk management, to predictive and adaptive management and from asset level to system or regional level. These trends require the search for smart solutions from technical, financial and governance point of view, to meet present day adaptive, societal and environmental requirements. The objective of this theme session is to exchange and discuss the best approaches and innovative practices in Life Cycle Engineering in water infrastructure.

 

Session (Monday, 11:00 – 13:00)

1.Challenges and opportunities in Life Cycle Management for water
infrastructure
Frank den Heijer
2.Can a pipe safely cross a dike without huge costs? A life cycle analysis based on probabilities and consequencesBabette Lassing
3.Scheduling for replacement and renovation of infrastructure; an optimisation methodFerdinand Diermanse
4.Practical approach for sustainability to achieve long-term value for money on (renovation) projectsOlga Brommet
5.Developing a resilient maintenance strategy for assets subject to changing conditionsMartijn de Jong
6.Stretching the boundaries of Infrastructure Asset Management – experience in large scale flood infrastructure asset managementAssela Pathirana

Elisabeth Keijzer (TNO)
Delft, The Netherlands

Daan Schraven (TU Delft)
Delft, The Netherlands

Sustainability is a relatively new perspective to Life Cycle Management. Infrastructure should be designed, constructed and managed during their life cycle in such a way that the harmful impacts for the environment are minimized. Key aspects that should be considered within sustainability assessment are for instance use of resources, energy and land, emissions to air, water and soil, pollution of environment by noise, vibrations and waste, and impact on species and ecosystem and society.

 

Session (Monday, 14:00 – 16:00)

1Towards a classification of adaptability strategies for the sustainability transition of critical infrastructuresIngrid Bolier
2A circularity assessment framework for bridge and viaduct designsTom Coenen
3A review of circular economy of key construction materials in transport infrastructure projectsXinyu Liu
4Creating uniform rules for calculating environmental impact of asphalt in the NetherlandsAnna Schwarz
5Towards greener asphalt: sustainability assessment for roads and road components in EuropeDiana Godoi Bizarro
6Monetary evaluation of environmental impacts of buildingsPatricia Schneider-Marin
7Existing Structures As Material Stock for Circular StructuresSiska Valcke

 

Agnieszka Bigaj-van Vliet (TNO)
Delft, the Netherlands

Fabio Biondini (Polytectinico di Milano)
Milano, Italy

Robby Caspeele (Ghent University)
Ghent, Belgium

Structural reliability deals with the probability of failure of structures over the remaining life. Structural reliability may change over time due to changes in the loads on the structure, changes in the strength of the structure, and changes in the remaining life time of the structure. Reliability can be assessed more precisely if uncertainties in loads and strength over time are known better. Structural reliability plays a major role in design guidelines, aiming to keep risks over the life cycle of a structure within accepted boundaries. For ageing structures structural reliability needs to be managed. Changes in loads and strength over time need to be monitored. Uncertainties need to be assessed and managed. Reliability of existing structures need to be evaluated over time, and sometimes re-calculated. Investment in managing the structural reliability need to be evaluated on costs and benefits over the life cycle.

In this workshop, we distinguish two distinctive pillars of the Life Cycle Management of the Structural Reliability of assets, both with a dedicated session. This theme session focuses on the Modelling

 

Session (Monday, 14:00 – 16:00)

1.Reliability based life cycle management scenarios for the Suurhoff bridgeIrina Stipanovic
2.Incorporation of time-dependent and spatially distributed degradation in a pre-posterior decision making frameworkEline Vereecken
3.Do nowadays Civil Engineers in Structural Reliability really have to know more about Maths than how to do Monte Carlo Experiments?Karl Wilhelm Breitung
4.Performance evaluation of containment structure under local prestressing tendon rupture conditionsJin Song
5. Advances on Life-Cycle Design, Assessment and Maintenance of Structures and Infrastructure SystemsFabio Biondini
6.Modelling dependencies between multiple bridge deterioration mechanismsGareth Calvert

 

Petra Paffen (Rijkswaterstaat)
Utrecht, the Netherlands

(Info to be added)

Session (Monday, 14:00 – 16:00)

1The actual use of LCC in maintenance decision making on network levelRob Treiture
2Life Cycle Engineering in a System of Systems – Lessons to be learnt from and for the RailwaysRobert Liskounig
3A research about future investment cost of road bridge network in South KoreaJaehoon Lim
4Challenges of life cycle management in the smart grid: Case Smart OtaniemiHelena Kortelainen
5Modular design for renewable cross-passage walls incl. fire doors in railway tunnelsThomas Thaller
6The use of some simple LCC rules when prioritizing maintenance measures for complete infrastructure networksRob Treiture

Marcel Hertogh (TU Delft)
Delft, the Netherlands

Jenne van der Velde (Rijkswaterstaat)
Utrecht, the Netherlands

Implementing Life Cycle Management in organizations and processes is a challenge. Traditional steering principles on short term issues are deeply in our cultures. Even tough the awareness on life cycle thinking grows, change is still hard to make. Both human factors and lack of technical tooling to support the changes play a role. New management concepts are needed, supported by proper tooling to make that change.

Session (Tuesday, 10:00 – 12:00)

1.Towards an Systems Engineering based framework for interoperable Asset Life Cycle Management processesMichael J.H. Baggen
2.Implementing an ISO 55.000 series based generic management system for governmental asset managersJos Wessels
3.Guidelines for a Common Approach to Life Cycle Cost Analysis in the Dutch Construction SectorKewei Pan
4.Performance age – A method to decide on the remaining functional life of bridgesAndreas Hartmann
5.Risk visualisation approaches for risk-based maintenance planning for bridges and tunnelsFarizha Aulia Martakusuma
6.Life Cycle and Asset Management; two of a kind?Jan Swier

 

Willy Peelen (TNO)
Delft, the Netherlands

Dan Frangopol (Lehigh University)
Bethelem, USA

Jose Matos (University in Minho)
Guimaraes, Portugal

Structural reliability deals with the probability of failure of structures over the remaining life. Structural reliability may change over time due to changes in the loads on the structure, changes in the strength of the structure, and changes in the remaining life time of the structure. Reliability can be assessed more precisely if uncertainties in loads and strength over time are known better. Structural reliability plays a major role in design guidelines, aiming to keep risks over the life cycle of a structure within accepted boundaries. For ageing structures structural reliability needs to be managed. Changes in loads and strength over time need to be monitored. Uncertainties need to be assessed and managed. Reliability of existing structures need to be evaluated over time, and sometimes re-calculated. Investment in managing the structural reliability need to be evaluated on costs and benefits over the life cycle.

In this workshop, we distinguish two distinctive pillars of the Life Cycle Management of the Structural Reliability of assets, both with a dedicated session. This theme session focuses on the Monitoring.

 

Session (Tuesday, 10:00 – 12:00)

1.Incorporation of Bridges into Assessment ProcedureMarkus Petschacher
2.Quantifying the effect of foundation stiffness on offshore wind turbine dynamic responseEmily Anderson
3.Determining the Remaining Life of an Immersed Tube Tunnel in the NetherlandsKenneth Gavin
4.Damage detection in bridges by means of structural monitoring: problems and possibilitiesAndrea Benedetti
5. Effective risk management of embankments along transport networks using InSAR monitoringJulie Ann Clarke
6.Life cycle model for railway tunnel Brajdica in CroatiaIrina Stipanovic

Greet Leegwater (TNO)
Delft, the Netherlands

Petra Paffen (Rijkswaterstaat)
Utrecht, the Netherlands

Road networks often have long life cycles. Roman road systems constructed 2000 years ago can still be recognized in the landscape. System- and network requirements may however change over time, so systems and networks also need to be adapted during their lifetime. Keeping systems and networks up to date and fit for purpose, especially on the long term, is a challenge. Lack of long term thinking will result in badly functioning, not fit for purpose, or even unsafe networks.

The Life Cycle Management of road systems typically needs to deal with system optimization, network management and optimization over the life cycle, while anticipating diverse challenges like aging, climate change and developments regarding heavy vehicle transport.

Session (Tuesday, 10:00 – 12:00)

1.A life cycle cost analysis of adaptation measures in the State of Virginia, United States, in response to the impacts of climate change on asphalt road pavement construction and maintenanceJoão Santos
2.Involving user delays resulting from infrastructure failure and maintenance in Life Cycle Cost analysisMarieke van der Tuin
3.Improving durability of asphalt pavement by means of Hydronic PavementArsel Inestroza
4.The use of statistical inference to estimate the life span of pavement types before reaching end of lifeLéon Schouten
5.Policies to extend the life of road assets – Presenting LCC aspects of the 2018 research report of the International Transport Forum / OECDFranziska Schmidt

 

(to be added)

(Info to be added)

Session (Monday, 16:30 – 18:00)

1.A new precursor for bacteria-based self-healing concrete derived from organic waste streamsHenk Jonkers
2.Asset Dynamics for Predictive Life Cycle Management – Case Study ‘Integrated Bridges and Circularity Model’Michel Kuijer
3.Modular design for renewable cross-passage walls incl. fire doors in railway tunnelsThomas Thaller